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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 8:21 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2011 2:59 pm
Posts: 297
Location: berlin
Ok. Since we have so much discussions going on about wheter Buzz should go commercial or not -
ask yourself why you are using Buzz instead of another commercial DAW after all.

In my case it is the multi pattern sequence editor which makes sequencing fast and also manages to keep the view clean.
Never seen anything like it in any other DAW.
And in general i prefer a tracker over pianoroll because i find it more logical to work with.


What are your reasons?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 9:59 am 

Joined: Fri Dec 02, 2011 5:37 pm
Posts: 35
My reasons are the same - the Sequence Editor, being able to just press 'Enter' to go into the pattern I am on, and then 'Enter' to go back to the Sequence Editor, being able to enter numbers or letters on the keyboard to enter a pattern in the Sequence Editor, all the while you can rename them all and still see the numbers (or letters) you have to use to enter them, on the right hand side of the Sequence Editor, this is all pure genius, and no other DAW compares to it for songwriting.
It's no good having all the bells and whistles if the most fundamental part of a program is hampering your songwriting, and all the other DAWs hamper my songwriting. In FL Studio I have to use a mouse to painstakingly position clips in the sequencer, they always go four beats to the right when you lay them down, so you have to drag them back over, you have to use a drop down menu to select which pattern you want to paste in, it's a right pain in the ass. Ditto with Renoise, the Pattern Matrix is an abomination, and just ridiculously over complicated to use, compared to the Buzz Sequence Editor.

That's why I mentioned in my other post that Oskari has a piece of 'intellectual property' that is not only brilliant, but none of the other DAW developers are intelligent enough to use it, so he has a monopoly on his brilliant design.

I started a song this morning in Buzz, took me just twenty minutes to get something decent, in Renoise or FL Studio it would have taken me twice as long.

I don't mind piano rolls, but prefer a tracker, it's much quicker to enter notes and data, no need for the mouse.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 9:05 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2012 7:15 pm
Posts: 30
Location: Göteborg / Sweden
strobotone wrote:
Ok. Since we have so much discussions going on about wheter Buzz should go commercial or not -
ask yourself why you are using Buzz instead of another commercial DAW after all.

In my case it is the multi pattern sequence editor which makes sequencing fast and also manages to keep the view clean.
Never seen anything like it in any other DAW.
And in general i prefer a tracker over pianoroll because i find it more logical to work with.


What are your reasons?


I produced 4 commercial albums and 2 EP's with buzz. just started learning it and still learn new things all the time. It's the speed and the modularity of the thing, it's simply un-fucking-beatable. I have like 6000 ideas lying around since i started using buzz in 2001 (!?) and whenever i lack inspiration i just pick up an idea and go on...


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 12:08 am 
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Joined: Fri May 04, 2012 10:24 am
Posts: 95
1 - My first reason to start using buzz was Matilde Tracker which made
it as good as Modplugtracker, at that time I thought.
(but buzz had all these nice effects, and there were many, but I didn't understand
them yet)

2 - Buzz got from ld a very good granuliser: ld Grain (that was in 2001 or 2002, I think).

3 - The sequencer: enter-enter to pattern and back. (feels like you can zoom in to
the pattern and zoom out to go to another pattern) , and quickly make the sequencer more
overviewable by putting <mute>'s or <break>'s at important places.

4 - No mouse-wrestling to get automation-values precise in (not-resizable :roll: ) draw-a-curve views.

5 - Learning about effects and destroying sounds.

6 - I don't like VST's/DAW's that don't show what's really happening or there's not
enough control over what can be done.

7 - When trying a new DAW I soon miss the buzzmachines, because I know
a lot of buzzmachines by now (but there are still a few I rarely tried).


Last edited by vacuum on Tue Jan 07, 2014 2:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 12:56 am 

Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2011 5:25 pm
Posts: 378
It was my dream to make electronik music but too expansive for me, so Buzz was a revelation, the interface is magic, just after 3 or 4 month is used it, peer LFO appears, and begins a fantastic journey with peer machines, now after 2 years of inactivity on my favorite software, i realize that i have found what i was looking for, of course with the help of the very cool devs and poeple here.
The potential of peer machines amazes me, peer chains stimulate my brain, machines become sort of primitive living creature in Buzz, i like it so much, Buzz= liberty.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 2:01 am 

Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:55 am
Posts: 381
1) aux sends are as easy as connecting this machine to that machine - this is probably still my #1 reason

2) experimental effects - when I need something that does something out of the ordinary there are at least 30 native effects I can experiment with

3) FSM Philthy

4) Peer machines that can do almost anything I imagine

5) IX Split makes Buzz into a workstation keyboard

6) BLOK Modular

7) As CPU power increases, the native Buzz machines use almost no CPU

8) 303 machines - Buzz is really the only DAW to nail 303 sequencing in an intuitive way. When I first started, I took this for granted, but now I realize how amazing it is.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 10:32 am 

Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:55 am
Posts: 111
The looks.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 12:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2011 11:20 am
Posts: 94
I wanted more control over the sounds in my xm modules. I saw somebody using samples from buzz in an xm. First I used buzz only for filtering sounds. But when I learnt how to how to use buzz I never went back to FT2.
Now I don't think there is any reason to find a better program except maybe for easier live playing/MIDI recording.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 3:41 pm 

Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:53 pm
Posts: 169
utrk + peer machines = cut above the rest breakcore madness .


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:25 pm 

Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2011 12:03 am
Posts: 60
Location: Iceland
It's the fastest and easiest way for me to make my ideas become reality.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 7:08 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2011 1:15 am
Posts: 492
Location: deep beneath the earths crust
i started using buzz in 2006 with absolutely no daw experience. i just knew i loved electronic music all my life and wanted to make it. buzz was free, lightweight, and had a friendly community. i've never looked back. as i started to learn more i tried out other daws and just didn't like all the mousework involved. i had stumbled blindly into the best possible program i could dream of for making music.

i also appreciated the fact that the machines and effects i started to use had the limits and configuration of basic synth/fx hardware and software. i could read or watch just about any tutorial for commercial software or even expensive hardware and since buzz machines didn't always offer the sort of "push a button to sound awesome" features that you pay for, i had to really learn what i was doing and translate all of that into something i could do in buzz (which i could NEVER have done without the help of the buzz forums). all the knowledge that i've gained translates to any other production experience, but i'm not sure that the same could be said of spending hundreds of hours with ableton or fl or cubase.

the main reason i started using buzz was because it was free and i was poor, now that i'm a little better off financially and know more about what i'm doing, i still don't feel the need to start using any commercial production software. i just love using buzz. :)


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 8:57 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2011 11:00 pm
Posts: 145
Cubase was my "7-4 job" (literary and unliterary), and when I discovered Buzz (in 2000) it became the playground.
I still use both, depending on my mood.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 7:23 pm
Posts: 288
I had used dos trackers for 5 years or so (screamtracker 3 and impulse tracker) and gone through a bit of a bad patch. A friend mentioned a new windows tracker that had all sorts of crazy stuff in it, and I gave buzz a try. Fell in love, samples worked the same way, very intuitive, first time I didn't need to use multiple channels to hand code delays :) The ability to program the machines I want is great, and I haven't tried to use other daw's in years..


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2014 5:56 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2011 2:59 pm
Posts: 297
Location: berlin
mantratronic wrote:
I had used dos trackers for 5 years or so (screamtracker 3 and impulse tracker) and gone through a bit of a bad patch. A friend mentioned a new windows tracker that had all sorts of crazy stuff in it, and I gave buzz a try. Fell in love, samples worked the same way, very intuitive, first time I didn't need to use multiple channels to hand code delays :) The ability to program the machines I want is great, and I haven't tried to use other daw's in years..


same here.

in addition :
c64 / voicetracker
> amiga / protracker
> pc / impulse tracker / screamtracker / fasttracker
> pc / buzz

yep. then there was no need anymore to copy entire patterns and make small changes to it.
being able to modify patterns independently for each machine is just the way to go.
still don´t know why the renoise team didn´t go in that direction.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2014 6:32 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 11:07 pm
Posts: 118
For me it was
1- the machine view section which makes routing a breeze and in this theory the sky is the limit. also
2- the fact that you can create a pattern for your effect channels is pretty rare and incredible that gives you all possibilities.
3- it has one incredible fully functional vst loader that almost no DAW out there has it.
4- there used to be a buzzchurch

But speaking of the sequencer, don't want to comment on the tracking part of it but there's no greater pain in the world than
1- not being able to see the dynamic view of your tracks (wave and rendered files) and the fact that
2- recording into an audio track is still a huge hassle and is not implemented in the software itself and you gotta joggle around the stuff developers have coded for this, hurts big time.
3- automation is deadly and time taking as you can simply work with guide lines and a click of a mouse on almost all of the DAWs out there.
4- The interface of the master machine can simply be changed to an incredible looking mixer


I have switched to Presonus Studio One for a year or so and I really miss buzz. Buzz could be the first tracker to beautifully implement the concept of a piano-roll DAW and the open look of a horizontal sequencer like a professional DAW. like pro tools, logic, cubase, sonar and even studio one.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2014 10:03 am 

Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:55 pm
Posts: 42
I used to use octamed years ago. When I switched to PC the first tracker I tried was buzz. Nothing since tracker or saw has ever come close to buzz for flexibility. The only other software I use is reaper for mastering and recording guitars and recently caustic 3 for making loops and ideas when I'm out and about.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:17 am 

Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2012 2:10 am
Posts: 45
Location: USA & China
These are my experiences and reasons for why I use Buzz:

- Because it's really fun. It's fun to make a track in Buzz. Never frustrating or like work.
- I like tracker interfaces, but Buzz' is the best. I own Renoise and many free trackers but they're all cumbersome compared to Buzz.
- The speed and ease of making patterns, copying them, switching between them and making a song in Pattern View and Sequence View is unbeatable compared to any other software. No time wasted trying to make so many different things go together.
- I have what feels like unlimited effects to choose from and unlimited sounds to create with the machines made for it. This combines with the fact that I love that I never have to load a VST to do any kind of synth sounds and can use Buzz on a weak CPU and rarely or never max it.
- I can't leave Buzz. It feels like home. I've tried or owned many of the popular DAWs and even if I feel excited or interested using a different DAW, I still can't do what I want to do in it as fast I can in Buzz, so I return to Buzz. Plus, I'm not rich and almost all of the DAWs these days need more and more powerful computers to run or do simple things. I don't have to "freeze" tracks or make 20 loops to bypass power limitations in Buzz.
- Buzz works the best for what I like to do and has shaped my standards of how I like to do it. I know my own music is usually garbage, but I like my garbage and Buzz helps me make that garbage no matter where I go in the world. (I'm not saying Buzz makes poor music, It's a joke about my skills)

If I spent some time, I could probably think of 100 more things to write. These are the most important to me. I'm not a music "Pro" or a power user of Buzz, and still have a lot to learn even after more than a decade using Buzz, but it's the only thing that keeps me making music. If it wasn't for Buzz I probably would have quit music a very long time ago or lost interest. Buzz always gives me something to do and be happy to do.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:32 pm 

Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 2:19 pm
Posts: 17
I use it as a modular VST(i) host.

3 keyboards, all with sustain/expression-pedals and breathcontroller, soundcard in/out using VST-effects controlled by midi...
It's great! Everything is possible! All vst/Vsti:s and samplelibs are freeware.
Thats what I use Live on stage. Recording I use Zynewave Podium Free.

Let it be free so will people use it.

/Blafot
_____________________
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9vIVO7zKWM


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 9:58 pm 

Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 8:30 pm
Posts: 368
1. Modular
2. Modular
3. Not forced into a mixer/bus system
4. Vertical multipattern sequencer
5. Tracker
6. Polac *.*
7. Large, native and unique effects library + low cpu
8. I've been apart of it so long, it's an extension of me and what I wanted
9. Peer/control system
10. Modular


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 6:38 pm 

Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:47 am
Posts: 15
I have been using Buzz since 2002 and since 2009 I make my living on music I make in Buzz.
I'm good and comfortable with Cubase and Logic as well, but Buzz is the only program that catches up with the speed thats going in my head when Im creating music. Everything is just so quick and easy. I want nothing else!


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